7 Habits, Agile, Agile, Experiment, Focus, Goals, Improvement, IT, Leadership, Learning Lessons, PI Planning, Release Train Engineer, SAFe, Scrum, SDLC, success, Technology, Tools, Trying, Vision

Prioritizing for I & A and PI Planning

A few weeks ago I started a new position called Release Train Engineer(RTE). This role is responsible for facilitating the Agile Release Train (ART) moves efficiently and executes effectively.  

When I started the position in late June, I had 2.5 weeks to get prepared for the two most significant events within the Scaled Agile Framework (SAFe) that fall on the same week – Inspect & Adapt workshop (I&A) and Program Increment (PI) Planning. I & A is the final event during the PI and PI Planning is the kickoff to the next PI. I & A is an opportunity to celebrate all the great work done in the past PI and identify ways to relentlessly improve for the next PI. PI Planning kicks off the next quarter to determine what work can get accomplished within the PI.

I quickly realized with my end goal in mind (a successful I & A and PI Planning) I needed to identify what was the most important (and urgent in this case) things to get done and prioritize those items accordingly. (side note: in the future, I hope to find ways to move some of these items into quadrant 2, so they are less urgent and just as important)

Here is what I did to get ramped up and successfully facilitate I & A and PI Planning

  1. Identify the right people – Making sure I knew who the Product Manager (PM), Product Owners (PO), Scrum Masters (SM), Solution Architect and Software Architect were, was my number one item. This was my top priority because I needed to understand what work was going into the next PI Planning and understand how the current and almost completed PI was coming along. Asking questions to the right people would help me understand the most important information in a short period of time.
  2. Understanding the features being brought into PI Planning – This was my second highest priority because the RTE needs to make sure these items are ready for PI planning. The RTE doesn’t control this work and due to this, they should make sure features are as ready as they can be before PI Planning. If the features are not ready, the RTE needs to facilitate their readiness. In this case, we had a few features intended on being ready for PI planning, but one feature needed to be broken down. The PO and Architects did a great job of working in the last two weeks to get this feature broken down in a way that multiple teams could work together, rather than dumping all the work on one team.
  3. Making sure socialization happens and is helpful – Socialization is hard but important, which is why as a new RTE I wanted to make sure this was happening and going well. Socialization is a proactive preparation approach to PI Planning. If the features aren’t ready or unclear, socialization will suffer because the team will get bogged down by questions and may cause confusion in the future. A lack luster socialization will create inefficiencies in PI Planning, which can slow down a very fast paced two days (you can read my last article here about socialization).
  4. Brainstorming the I & A narrative – I & A is an opportunity to tell a story about the train’s journey during the PI. It is not a time just to dump data or point fingers. It is a time to improve and part of that improvement is to understand the context behind what happened in the PI using data to help elevate the narrative. I chose Grit as the anecdote to tell the story. The team has a ton of passion about Appraisals and persevered through many challenges. The data helped show how a lot of great things were achieved, despite the challenges throughout the PI.   
  5. Understanding data – Data can be dangerous if used incorrectly or misunderstood. As a new RTE who was not part of the train in the past, I was unsure what data was being looked at and measured throughout the PI. I talked with several of the right people (like the Scrum Master) to understand what they were or were not tracking. Also, I bounced ideas off other RTEs to identify what data made sense to use. I used a handful of data points in our I & A: Capacity Allocation – Planned versus Actual, Train Velocity – showing how work from another PI came in throughout the PI, and Cumulative Flow Diagram – showed how our cycle time was pretty good despite lots of unplanned work.
  6. Reviewing the SAFe site – When I started, I had a working knowledge of SAFe and the RTE role, but I am always learning and finding new information. In fact, I referred to the SAFe site on a regular basis when I was a Scrum Master. As I began to prepare my presentation, I constantly referred to SAFe’s site to make sure all my presentations hit on the major items needed for both events.
  7. PowerPoint – Creating my slide decks was really the last thing I did, BUT it took way more time than I anticipated. PowerPoint is not something I use often because I don’t give a ton of presentations and when I do use PowerPoint, I don’t make a bunch of slides. This time around, I knew I needed more information on the slides especially because of the Problem-Solving Workshop. Despite the time I spent working in PowerPoint, I still believe it made sense to prioritize this last because everything else I did before this gave me the content, I needed for my slide deck.

Image credit: https://www.developgoodhabits.com/eisenhower-matrix/

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Communication, Discipline, Experience, Improvement, Leadership, Learning Lessons, Remote, Remote Leadership, Self-Awareness, success, Team Building, Technology

After One Year, I Stopped Working Remotely

I spent the past year working remotely. Working remotely sounded great! I envisioned that I’d be able to work from anywhere and be super productive. I talked to other remote team members to try and anticipate any issues and made preparations based on their suggestions. I thought I was prepared. It’s not exactly like the feature image for this post, but I think it can be close. Here are my learning lessons.

What Went Well

I was always caught up on email, rarely late to meetings and always got solo tasks completed on time.

Also, I found that leading remote teams, as a remote team leader, really helped me understand some of the challenges of being remote. I believe it enhanced leading remote team members, more than leading remote team members strictly from an office, as I have done in the past.

What Didn’t Go Well

I found myself struggling to collaborate with my leadership group and other team members at times, I spent a  lot of time making calls and leaving messages, sometimes I was physically uncomfortable and most unexpectedly, I was more lonely than I anticipated.

Bottom Line

Working remotely can definitely work, it just didn’t work for me. I prefer to work in the offices and around other people, rather than work remotely at home.

Why?

For me in my current role, my strengths are best suited for in-person interactions and I personally work better when I am in an office. I thought about working from a co-working space, but never took action on that, although I would encourage and suggest co-working spaces to others, if a viable option.

Suggestions For Others

I believe taking time to think about implementing these suggestions can improve and help anyone that is looking to transition into a remote environment. What is your experience? Let me know!

Try It Out Before Making The Jump

Remote work may or may not be for you. You should think about your strengths (more below), talk to other remote team members to understand their insights and try a short period of seriously working from home, before working remotely full time to see what works best for you. I suggest a three month trial period because it’s short enough to get a good understanding if it is right for you but not too long that you may suffer from it. Also, I suggest looking into a co-working space and trying that during your trial period.

Know Thy Self

What are your strengths? What allows you to bring your very best, as often as possible? If you don’t know these, you should spend some time reflecting and identify these items.

For me, my strengths are my physical energy, my curiosity to learn from others and build relationships, and my general energy/enthusiasm on a day-to-day basis. When I moved, I didn’t realize I’d be positioning myself in a way that impacted these. I realize you can still accomplish some of these things over the phone or via Skype/Zoom, but I determined remote work limited these strengths at times.

I Really Missed Office Furniture

Good desk chairs ARE SO WORTH IT! I missed our desk chairs more than any other material object. No free coffee, slushies, snacks, standing desks, fun events etc., will compare to how much a comfortable desk chair will literally make or break your work week. I bought a cheap IKEA desk chair on craigslist and it was fine, for a few weeks. Then it wasn’t. If you are seriously going to work remotely, invest in your office set up or work from a co-working space that has good furniture. A great desk chair, good desk and second monitor are essential, in my opinion, for a baseline level of success as a remote team member.

Working By Yourself Can Be Lonely

I enjoy working around other people that want to do great things. It inspires me and it provides a layer of support that I didn’t realize I needed until I moved.

Working at home, alone, became pretty lonely. I still got my work done, but it was harder to bounce ideas off people and build relationships with people you don’t know as well. I really enjoy bouncing ideas off others, but to be successful (in my opinion) you need to bounce ideas off lots of different people all the time. Building newer relationships to do this, remotely, was a lot more difficult for me than I anticipated.

Working With Non-Remote Team Members Requires Good Technology

This is a really big thing. If you’ve never worked remotely (different than working from home one day a week), it can be really hard to understand how to interact or connect with a remote TM. The amount of meetings where Zoom (remote conference room tech) didn’t work properly, happened multiple times per week.

In addition, make sure you set up expectations with yourself and your team on how you will be communicating on a regular basis. Using Zoom/Skype + a web cam is the best in my opinion because it’s the closest thing to face-to-face communication. It is great to see people, rather than just using a phone.

I did find that calling people from your cell phone in a day where robo-calls makes you feel really popular requires more time leaving messages, sending follow up emails/IMs and then waiting for replies. This became less efficient than I expected at first.

Keep A Routine & Get Some Fresh Air

I would wake up, bike to work, workout, shower, go to the office and eat breakfast in the office. This was my morning routine for most of the time I worked in Detroit. When I moved, I tried a few different things and ultimately found that minus a commute, working out before work, showering and eating breakfast set me up for success before I logged on  for the day.

Just because you work remotely, doesn’t mean you should sacrifice what makes you successful at getting prepared  to bring your best to work. You should prepare yourself just like you were going to the office, minus the commute.

Lastly, now that you aren’t commuting anymore take some time to leave your space and get some fresh air. While I was advised to separate your work space from your living space, I couldn’t do that. If you can’t afford to separate spaces, I believe it’s important to regularly separate yourself from your space so you avoid cabin fever.

 

Picture credit: https://www.myob.com/au/blog/the-future-of-working-remotely/

entrepreneurship, Flipping, Goals, Hard Money, hustle, Hustle Estate, Improvement, Leadership, Learning Lessons, Purchase, Real Estate, Rehab, success, Technology

Hustle Estate – Flipping Homes 101 – Ep 5

Flipping Homes 101 – Ed and Isaac walk through the overall process it takes to flip a home. Ed talks about where he buys homes from, what to think about when looking to flip a home and how to get a hard money loan.

Feel free to reach out with questions or comments on Twitter/Instagram (@HustleEstate) or send us an email HustleEstate1@gmail.com

Happy hustling!

 

Music – Showtime by Artlss – https://www.melodyloops.com/tracks/showtime/