Leadership, Learning Lessons, Tools

Are We Professionals?

Recently, I attended a two day Scrum workshop. Someone in the workshop asked our facilitator if there was a better way to estimate the amount of work we could accomplish in a two week sprint to avoid dropping work. After some back and forth, our facilitator said, “We are professionals. The team does not hold each other accountable, we hold each other up.”

This comment made me think, “Do we think of ourselves as ‘Professionals’? And if so, what does professional mean to us?”

For most of my life, I only thought of athletes as professionals because there are tiers below the NBA, NFL, NHL, MLB, etc., where people are considered semi-pro or amateur and working towards “professional” status.

So do we, as engineers (quality and software), team leaders, business analysts and others in the technology world, consider and treat ourselves as professionals?

Overall, I think we do because I think professionalism comes down to meeting, and hopefully exceeding, clear expectations.

For example, a professional athlete is expected to be healthy, on time for practice and games, attend team meetings, practice their craft, mentor younger professionals (ie: rookies) and be a role model for non-professionals.

Similarly, as a technology professional, I expect all of my team members to be on-time, attend their meetings, work on their craft, mentor newer team members and more.

I found three tools that helped clarify what it means to be a professional in our technology world.

  1. Team Agreements – Everyone on the team brainstorms ideas about what expectations they would like everyone on the team to meet. Eventually the team filters the list down to 5-10 clear items to live by. Some examples that my team came up with: Everyone be able to read and diagnosis application errors, have a team discussion for all walk-ins, and take care of yourself first – healthy mind and body = successful team members, to name a few.
  2. Team Values – Values are your DNA; it’s what drives you and your team. One value my team lives by is “Give a damn.” Giving a damn is a fun way to say you care and when you care about your work, you will give it your all.
  3. Definition of Done – When you finish a feature, what does it mean to be done? Is the software working? Is the feature in your production environment? How much testing should you do before you consider a feature done? Answering these questions is important because it helps set a professional standard of what it means to be done with your work.

These are some tools I’ve found to be useful. What are some concepts you use to set a level of professionalism?

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Goals, Leadership

Shredding Down Goal Mountain

 

Last week, I traveled with some of my best childhood friends to go skiing in Colorado. We spent three amazing days skiing Keystone, Vail and A-Basin. After each day of skiing I felt mentally refreshed and ready to take on the next monumental mountain.

When we finished our last day of skiing, I mentioned to my friends that when I was skiing down down the mountain I only thought about skiing. My mind was clear of all other thoughts. My friend responded, ‘you can free your mind because you are so focused on that one goal ahead of you. Making it down the mountain, alive.’

We laughed but there is a lot of truth behind his comment.  A clear and measurable focus is critical to achieving your goals.

Skiing illustrated three major aspects of having a clear and measurable focus that can translate into the office.  

  1. Have a clear and measurable end in mind, like making it down the mountain alive and uninjured.
    • In technology, one of my team’s goal is to eliminate manual testing for our PDF documents by the end of 2017
  2. When you’re going down the mountain and you come to a cliff, you may need to pivot and try a different route to arrive at your goal.
    • As we work to eliminate manual testing, we will try a number of different methods to automate the testing of documents. We’ve tried using GUI automation to trigger a CompareDocs tool we use in our system. We are also working on finding ways to compare XMLs that are created versus what is expected. The key here is to constantly tinker and try different routes.
  3. After you pivot away from the cliff, be mentally and physically prepared for any situation that may come up, like sharp turns and other steep slopes.
    • It can be physically and mentally taxing to work hard on something and find out that route you just tried isn’t going to work out. When you pivot and it doesn’t go well, be prepared to try again, work a few extra hours, invest more time to learn what you don’t know and sometimes put on a good face when you are disappointed.

Keeping these aspects in mind while planning and working through your goals will only increase your ability to shred down bigger mountains!

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(all photos in this post are mine)